Woodrow Wilson

African Americans in Las Vegas

Over the course of the twentieth century, economic opportunities encouraged black migration to the Las Vegas area, but racial discrimination curtailed aspirations for decent employment. Partnership in a ranch attracted John Howell, the first black man known to own property in Southern Nevada; however the railroad, gaming, and federal projects drew most African Americans to Las Vegas. By 1910, out of the 945 residents of Las Vegas, forty were black.

Washoe Basket Weavers

The people of the Washoe tribe of Nevada and California have long practiced the art of weaving. Both men and women created the tools and products necessary to make a living in a land that required seasonal movements. Heavy pottery or bulky wooden items were not suited to this environment nor to the mobile lifestyle of the indigenous people.

George Springmeyer and the Nevada Progressive Party

The Nevada Progressives emerged in the wake of a profound reconfiguration of the state's political parties. Following a brief flirtation in the 1890s with the Silver Party, quickly hijacked by the old guard, Nevada political sentiments shifted when the central Nevada mining boom after 1900 halted the long depression linked to the decline of mining.

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